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Castle Archdale, Northern Ireland Coastal Command

Hard Times
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Most of the squadrons who served on Lough Erne have their crests displayed in the Church of Ireland, Irvinestown.

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One of the earliest tragedies in the squadron, crew pictures began after this date.

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Names on memorial tablet to 1943 Sunderland crash

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201 crew funeral August 1943.
The scene outside Irvinestown Church of Ireland as the funeral cortege arrives.

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As it looks today.

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A funeral at Sacred Heart Church on way to cemetery.
Leading the parade is the Rev. John Treanor, he buried almost all the wartime casualties laid to rest in Irvinestown Church of Ireland.
The two altar boys are Joe Magee (carrying cross) and Lawrence Sweeney. The other priest is the airforce chaplain.
Recent information provided to me from Joe O"Loughlin, who witnessed this crash and was on the scene within 1 hour, has confirmed that this is the funeral of Sarg. J.R. Forrest of the R.C.A.F. who died in the Sunderland crash near Belleek. Also the young 'Altar boy' bearing the processional cross and wearing white shoes is Joe McGee.

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As it looks today

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This is the funeral of Nesbitts crew - 423 RCAF which died when their Sunderland crashed outside Irvinestown in Feb. 45 at the extended Commenwealth Plot at the rear of the Church of Ireland church Irvinestown

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Today the scene has changed very little.

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The funeral of the crew from the 201 squadron Sunderland which crashed on Mount Brandon in August 1943.

The late Mr. Jim Wright told Mr. James Stewart how he watched this aircraft simply "disappear from my radar screen" , both aircraft were bound for the Bay of Biscay.

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Same view today

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The funeral of the crew from the 201 squadron Sunderland.

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As it looks today.

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Original grave markers of DD848 Irvinestown Church of Ireland graveyard

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Funeral of the 201 Squadron crew

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As it looks today.

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Flt.Sgt ( W.Op/Ag) John R. Coster. Aged 23.
Flt.Lt. (Pilot) Arthur C. Griffin. Aged 27.
Flt.Lt. (Pilot) Charles S. Grossey. Aged 32.
Flt. Sgt. (Nav.) Norman B Pickford. Aged 25.
Sgt. ( W.Op/AG) George F. Tilt. Aged 38.
F/O. (Pilot) Guy Nelson Wilkinson.

Funeral of the 201 Squadron crew

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As it looks today

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These engines belong to 201 Sunderland DD848 which crashed on Mount Brandon on 22nd August 1943 one of several Castle Archdale based Sunderlands sent to Biscay that day .
This one is located on the side of Brandon , a mountain which claimed several aircraft including a BOAC Sunderland , a Wellington and a FW-200.

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Original crash location for Sunderland DD848

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The plot at the back of the Church ,
Fl/lt Nesbitt's crew of 423 Squadron , lost in Feb. 1945 when they crashed at Knocjknagor bog NW of Irvinestown.
This crew had damaged U-921 off Norway in May 1945

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The plot at the back of the Church ,
Fl/lt Nesbitt's/Hailstone's crew of 423 Squadron 1945

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Funeral Parade

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As it looks today

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WAR GRAVES IN THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCHYARD IRVINESTOWN

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WAR GRAVES IN THE CHURCH OF IRELAND CHURCHYARD IRVINESTOWN

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WAR GRAVES IN THE CHURCH OF IRELAND CHURCHYARD IRVINESTOWN

 
Memorial Stone

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Pilot Officer Hebenston
The poppy is attached to part of the aircraft which was recovered from the scene of the crash.

 
Memorial for a 422 RCAF Sunderland which crashed on a FAE in this field on 12 February 1944 , two crew members died in the crash.
P/O LA. Hebenton
SGT. RW. Bodsworth

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Same graveyard photo as above, at the time of this photo it only contained  the F/lt. Nesbitt / Hailstone crew

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Above shows the funeral of a 423 RCAF crew which was lost on 11/02/45 when they crashed into bogland 5 miles NE of Irvinestown. The aircraft had an engine fire soon after take off - the fire spread to a wing and the aircraft crashed , the pilot unable to put down flew away from base and the town and put down on Bogland - all were killed. In recent years an identity braclet belonging to P/O. Hailstone was recovered from the site and returned to his family in Canada
F/lt. Nesbitt and crew
 

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131 OYU Memorial
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sunderland DW110 of 228 Squadron

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On 31st January 44 Sunderland DW110 of 228 Squadron whilst returning to Pembroke Dock was diverted to land at Castle Archdale.
the aircraft was approaching from the North overflying the Bluestacks in Co.Donegal closing on the beacon which would take them up the corridor to Castle Archdale.
Unfortunately she hit a peak in the Bluestacks and 7 out of the crew of 12 were killed.
A few more feet and she would have cleared.
The nose gunner warned his pilot that he could see land and seconds later she crashed.
Over the years scrap dealers cleared the site but today some large pieces of the aircraft still remain , alot of it has found its way into gullies and has fallen down the steep mountain side.
Some of the uninjured crew walked 5 miles to a nearby farmers house and they came back to aid the crew , some of the crew are buried in irvinestown Church of Ireland.

Part of the tail section.

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In terms of flying time she was about half an hour away from Archdale when she crashed after this peak she was home and dry - a few feet was the difference between life and death.
Another view of the tail section - roots for the tail plane and rudder sections can be seen and the hull lines made out , this looks "towards" the rear turret which would be just beyond this section

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Sgt. H. Dunbar, F/O A.E. Whitworth, Sgt. C.H. Slack, Sgt. R.H. Oldfield, A/G. F.R.A. Chalk, Sgt. H.H. Newbury, F/O. Harold Seward – all RAF. P/OC.P. Davidson, RCAF. All killed when Catalina AM 265 -240 Sq. crashed on Aunagh Hill, Glenade,Kinlough,Co. Leitrim on 21st March 1941.
 
 

Above is a photo of their graves.

 

The following is taken from the diary of Sgt. John Iverach ( RCAF) who was stationed at RAF Lough Erne in March 1941

 

Thursday March 20 th 1941.
Above is a photo of their graves.

 

The following is taken from the diary of Sgt. John Iverach ( RCAF) who was stationed at RAF Lough Erne in March 1941

 

Thursday March 20 th 1941.

"Spent the day as usual reading - this time a mystery novel and filing snapshots and negatives.
Tonight I had to go down to the pier to act as welcoming committee of one and guide ( at F/lt. Jack Holmes request) for the crews of the two kites from Stranraer - two PBY's from 240 Squadron.
The whole squadron is moving over here in a day or two and these two kites are the first two to come and operate from here, starting their maiden operational flights tomorrow morning - to comb the Atlantic for 16 hours out as far as 23 or 24 West , for some German cruisers alleged to be raiding in that vicinity.
Dimi Havlicek was on one and he gave me his version of the experience he had on "99" when forced down on the sea near the Mull of Kintyre. Good to see him again as it also was to see Ted Lilly, Pete Mathews and the rest.
The other kite had none other than Peers Davidson as observer , who was a sight for sore eyes. P/O Seward was with them - the bloke who flew for a few trips on "95". I rode up in the lorry with Peers and Seward with the rest of the crew in the back - Dixie Dunbar, Harry Newbury , Chalky and Oldfield.
After showing them all to their quarters in what used to be the hay-loft ( tch,tch!) - and rustling up some grub for them , we all went up to the Sergeants Mess and we spent quite a nice evening talking about the new boats - over a few ales.
Finished my book and so to bed at 1.00a.m. ."

1st PBY crashed today - 8 killed.

March 21st Friday.
"This was a day of tragedy , although it wasn't until midnight that I learned the worst. Knowing of nothing out of the ordinary happening, I had gone to Enniskillen at 4.30 pm with Strap , Davies and Dredge where we had a gay time , playing Russian Bagatelle at the Imperial Hotel , Ping Pong at the YMCA and seeing "Lucky Partners" at the Town Hall Cinema. It was not till we got into the taxi for home, that we had the first confirmation of rumours of a mishap - when the taxi driver Aiken (* from Irvinestown) said he had herad of a flying boat crashing in the Free State. We wouldn't have believed it but for a few queer things which had occurred - that could be explained by the fact that the rumour was true.
F/lt Holmes had stopped us as we were leaving the castle and asked us was on the crew of "A" - and he seemed in a stew over something; earlier when I heard went to the ops room to see if we were released for the day. I was not allowed in - an unsual thing - and Goup Captain Bates was busy on the phones , surrounded by officers also unusual for he always phoned from his own office.
these significant occurances meant nothing at the time but now they did- and as soon as we got to the castle I rushed to the operations room and one look at the face of the controller told me the truth. he gave me what details he could , namely that A , the second one to take off this morning had crashed into a peak in the Free State and that the whole crew of eight were killed - burnt beyond recognition - F/lt. Whitworth , P/O Seward ( who was on out kite for couple of weeks) , Peers Davidson ; Sgts. Harry Newbury , Dixie Bumbar, chalk , Oldfield.
It seems that I was trying to climb, after jettisoning aqll depth charges and bombs, with one motor to get back to base whenthey crashed into this particular height of land which was 2100 feet high.
They're trying to get the bodies out tomight if possible.
This was the making of history for the PBY's that left here this morning were the first operational flight for an American flying boat in the RAF - the first flights for the new kites of which 240 Squadron was as proud and optimistic.
We all sat gloomily thinking how last night we were all so cheerily drinking beer in the Mess - kidding Harry and Dixie about how today would be their end and a black mark against the PBY's. Little did we dream that we spoke the truth. I thought of Peers davidson with whom I was in company as much as in training and in whoose room I sat ( on his invitation) at Stranraer last Friday Fl/lt Vince Furlong and recalling our party at the King Edward Hotel in Toronto , when he and I took Madeline and Margret Walker out.
Peers is the first of our class ( that I know) to pass on , I wonder who is next.
Bed at 1.00 a.m..

The other PBY had to land at Bowmore on account of weather after going to 23 W over the Atlantic , wonder if they heard the news yet.

(Will finish this off tomorrow).

 

Tuesday March 25th 1941.
"Very depressing day. rained like Hell from morning till night.
This afternoon the funeral for the boys killed in the crash was held at irvinestown.Only six of the eight buried there.
F/lt Whitworth , P/O Peers davidson, Sgts. Dixie Dunbar , Chalk and "Al" Oldfield. (P/O Seward , his body wassent to his folks and harry Newbury being R.C. is having his funeral tomorrow.
It was a very impressive ceremony, but therain spolied it. Slow marched for about a half a mile to the Church behind the beirs and then in.Quite a crowd mostly Army , Home-Guard , RUC and RAF but a lot of curious folks from Irvinestown who wanted to watch.
they were laid to rest in the graveyard just outside the church with full military honours , firing party, bugler ( whose bugle got water in it and wouldn't blow worth a damn).
Group captain bates and the C.O. asked me afterwards if when writing to Peers mother , I would enclose a photograph which he is having taken of the grave. damn nice of him I say.
the two crews were supposed to move down to the new quarters at Killadeas - 4 miles away - into horribke nissan huts, raining as it was and wet we were , we didn't like the idea for tonight , so when Ho,mes phoned and told us to get off down there after tea - I phoned him and persuaded him to let us stay till morning. Gotta leave at 8.30 and have breakfast there - if we can get any !
F/Sgt Barret returned today from his leave with his OBE medal which was presented to him at Buckingham palace by the King. he told me all about it. Also says London is having hell bombed out of it, especially last Thursday and Friday nights - but wedropped ten tons of bombs on Berlin last night so "Even Stephens".
Yugoslavia signed a Pact with Germany today , what now !
Lost "10 bob" at "Pontoon" tonight - but won it back and more at "Rap" Poker a couple of hours later.
Wrote a 15 page letter to Peg - til 12.30 - last out of the mess as usual.


"Spent the day as usual reading - this time a mystery novel and filing snapshots and negatives.
Tonight I had to go down to the pier to act as welcoming committee of one and guide ( at F/lt. Jack Holmes request) for the crews of the two kites from Stranraer - two PBY's from 240 Squadron.
The whole squadron is moving over here in a day or two and these two kites are the first two to come and operate from here, starting their maiden operational flights tomorrow morning - to comb the Atlantic for 16 hours out as far as 23 or 24 West , for some German cruisers alleged to be raiding in that vicinity.
Dimi Havlicek was on one and he gave me his version of the experience he had on "99" when forced down on the sea near the Mull of Kintyre. Good to see him again as it also was to see Ted Lilly, Pete Mathews and the rest.
The other kite had none other than Peers Davidson as observer , who was a sight for sore eyes. P/O Seward was with them - the bloke who flew for a few trips on "95". I rode up in the lorry with Peers and Seward with the rest of the crew in the back - Dixie Dunbar, Harry Newbury , Chalky and Oldfield.
After showing them all to their quarters in what used to be the hay-loft ( tch,tch!) - and rustling up some grub for them , we all went up to the Sergeants Mess and we spent quite a nice evening talking about the new boats - over a few ales.
Finished my book and so to bed at 1.00a.m. ."

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Sgt. Ronald Oldfield R.A.F.  Ronald was killed when Catalina AM 265 -240 Sq. crashed on Aunagh Hill, Glenade,Kinlough,Co. Leitrim on 21st March 1941

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All that remains in situ of 201 Sunderland ML743 which crashed on the mountains above Killybegs on 14/03/45 - the last aircrew to be killed on operational flying from Lough Erne.
A few months earlier they had sunk U-297 but it would be 50 years odd later that they would be credited with the "kill".
If you look at the photo taken in the Churchyard , they are the crew buried at the front - their headstones being nearest the camera.
This piece of the reduction gear and three more like it almost all that remains on site.
The aircraft was well to the North of where she should have been , I can only conclude that she was off course and flew into highground.

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Frank wasthe skipper of a 422 RCAF crew which force landed in Clew Bay just off Clare Island on 24th May 1943.
They had been on patrol from Bowmore ( On Islay , off the West Coast of Scotland ) and were diverted to land at Castle Archdale.
Although there was radio contact with the aircraft some of the messages were incomplete and unclear.
The aircraft may have been in difficulties but for whatever reason she put down off Clare Island with the loss of all on board.
Frank Paige had previously served with 407 RCAF in the Channel and was awarded the DFC :
"H.M. the King, on the recommendation of the A.O.C. Coastal Command, has graciously been pleased to make an award of the distinguisher Service cross to P/O. Franklyn Ernest paige for the fortitude he displayed , although severly wunded , in bringing his aircraft and crew back safely to his base after successfully attacking an enemy merchant vessel"
"One the morning in May 1942 , this officer was the pilot of an aircraft which participated in an attack on a convoy off the enemy coast. regardless of a fierce defensive barrage, which in the full light of the morning was extremely accurate, Piot officer Paige pressed home his attack. Although seriously wounded by a splinter from a shell which smashed through his instrumenet panel , this officer corageously flew his aircraft back to base"
Frank's younger brother "Bill" was lost in May 1944 when his lancaster collied with another aicraft as they waited in the circuit to land at Coningsby, he was an air gunner.

Frank had only been with 422 for a short time - approximately two weeks before he was lost.
 
 
25th May 1943. DD846. 422 Squadron based at Oban, Scotland
It was instructed to terminate this particular patrol at Castle Archdale. Crashed off Clare Island, Co. Mayo. Four Crew members are buried in Irvinestown Cemetery

 
CREW MEMBERS KILLED
 
F/O E.F. Paige, RCAF
F/O  J.W. Clarke,  RCAF
Sgt. W.G. Hoops, RCAF
Sgt.  R.B. Bryers, RCAF
Sgt. D.A. O'Dowd, RCAF
Sgt. D.H. Richardson,  RCAF
Sgt.  R. Sherwood, RCAF
Sgt. J. Rowe,  RCAF
Sgt.  J. Hird, RCAF
Sgt.  D. Purvis, RCAF
W/O. W.R. Thompson RCAF
 
Frank's grave is in the next photo below.

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Frank Paige DFC.

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The Commonwealth Plot at the rear of the Church of Ireland.

The first row of headstones - hatton's crew from 201 squadron who flew into high ground above Killybegs on 14th March 1945 - the last crew to be lost from Castle Archdale - in December 1944 they had sank U-297 although it was to be over 50 years later before this would be confirmed.
Behind them Hailstone's crew - this Sunderland just like Devines crew had an engine failure soon after take off - the reduction gear failed and they lost a prop. which again proved fatal .
A fire spread to the wing and the aircraft which flew over Irvinestown , the flames consuming the port wing.
The Aircraft crashed at Knocknagor Bog 5 miles north of the twon between Irvinestown and Dromore , all on board were killed.

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This is  the memorial to the three crew members who died of NJ175 Sunderland that crashed at Cashelard/Corlea, Co. Donegal on 12th August 1944.
 
Sunderland Landing On Erne
 
The following was written by group Captain Joe Frizzle RCAF 422 Squadron:
 
 
Quote - Also flying control, which included A/C mooring area were nearly all ex World War 1 R.A.F. pilots who knew little about modern aircraft, resulting in frequent disagreements with Squadron Commanders. I was in RCAF 422 squadron, we lost I believe 4 aircraft.
 
One was lost basically on a transportation trip on the way to Gibraltar. This was one we believed to be shot down by a German JU88. The second aircraft, Sunderland NJ175 was lost after an engine failed shortly after take off with a full fuel load.
 
Flying control directed the Captain to proceed to an open ocean area about 20 miles away and jettison the fuel before returning to land.
 
Before reaching the ocean area, the wind milling propeller seized and flew off, destroying another engine on the same side. The aircraft crashed with the resulting loss of 3 members.
 
I believe the aircraft should have been directed to land immediately at Archdale. I later had occasion to land with a full fuel load with no difficulties.
 
Hospital facilities were in an old castle several miles from Archdale and it was rumoured that if you went in with a cold, you came out with pneumonia.
 
The above are the words of Joe Frizzle RCAF 422 Squadron.
 
 
 
 
 

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422 Sunderland which crashed at Troy just to the north of Enniskillen in February 1944.
She was on a fighter affiliation exercise with a 235 Squadron beaufighter and they were right down on the deck just above tree top height , lower than should have been.
The Sunderland dropped down to try and pick up some airspeed and in doing so struck a telephone line , she banked slightly to climb over a small hill and in doing so stalled , she hit the ground , cut across a lane way and ploughed across a field , two members of the crew were killed and several were injured.

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Photo from Mr Art Mountford
The names underlined (See photo below)- Art's crew mates who became part of Al. Bishop's crew , these lads did not survive their encounter with U-489.
Horsborough knew how to cook herring Art didn't so they changed positions - Art. stayed "on the set" - this decided who would live and who would die.
"Ginger" Harcroft died after being rshot in the forehead. 
George Holly - he died when his 422 Squadron crew was shot down off Norway by U-921 - some wreckage and the body of Claude Senton cast ashore on Norway being the only trace of the Sunderland found.
Nesbit's crew from 423 attacked minutes later and U-921 was forced under , her captain ( Wolfgang Leu closing the hatch from outside to save his crew- he was too was drowned.)
Jack Sumner now a Squadron leader was to move to command 422 RCAF the sister Squadron - he returned to Lough Erne in late 43
Luck saved Art Mountford that day , it possibly saved Don Macfie as well.
Cook's crew was due off before Bishop's - both heading to patrol South of Iceland - a minor engine problem put Bishop away before them - only for that Cook might well have encounter 489 instead of Al. Bishop.

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EADIE, Sgt James Strathie (RAF 1370101) - British Empire Medal - No.422 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 October 1944. Born 1920 at Chesterfield House, Currie, Midlothian. Air Ministry Bulletin 16023/AL.882 refers.

In February 1944, an aircraft in which this airman was serving as wireless operator (air) collided with a high tension cable and crashed in flames. Two of the crew were killed and seven were injured. Sergeant Eadie, however, escaped injury. Although he was soaked in engine oil, he gallantry re-entered the blazing aircraft and rescued a crew member who was trapped and unconscious. He passed him out of the aircraft to a civilian who had arrived to help in removing the injured. Sergeant Eadie again entered the aircraft and, with the assistance of the civilian, helped three other members of the crew to safety. He did not leave the wreckage until the whole of the crew had been accounted for. During this time the aircraft was burning furiously and ammunition was exploding. Sergeant Eadie's courage and complete disregard for his personal safety were of a very high order.

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8784 has the original recommendation drafted 10 June 1944 by W/C J.R. Frizzle. He had participated in only one operational sortie, although his flying time totalled 418 hours 25 minutes.

At 1050 hours on 20th February 1944, a Sunderland flying boat in which Sgt Eadie was a crew member collided with the high tension cable at Trory, Ballinamallard, County Fermanagh, and crashed in flames. Two of the crew were killed and seven were injured. Sergeant Eadie, although uninjured, was badly shaken up and soaked with engine oil.

At great risk to himself, Sgt Eadie re-entered the blazing hull. He found one crewman trapped and unconscious in the bomb room and handed him out to a civilian, William H. Lunny who also assisted in removing the injured crew members.

He again entered the hull and with Mr. Lunny assisted three other crew men to safety and did not leave the scene of the crash until he had accounted for the entire crew. In all, four men had been assisted or carried to safety, two members having been thrown clear of the wreckage. One member was killed on being thrown from the wreckage and the second member to lose his life was found in a gun turret which had been torn off and was lying a short distance away. During the time the rescue work was proceeding the aircraft was burning furiously and ammunition was exploding.

Sergeant Eadie displayed great gallantry and were it not for the combined heroic effors of himself and Mr, Lunny it is doubtful if the lives of the four injured members of the crew remaining in the burning aircraft would have been saved.

The Group Captain who commanded the station added his remarks on 10 June 1944:

This Non-Commissioned officer, by his disregard for his personal safety immediately after his own miraculous escape from the crash displayed the highest qualities of determination and courage. Award strongly recommended.

The Air Officer Commanding, No.15 Group, wrote (16 June 1944):

Strongly recommended. The conduct of Sgt Eadie in entering the burning wreckage and saving other members of the crew was of a very high order.

Air Chief Marshal W. .Sholto Douglas, Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Coastal Command, wrote "Strongly recommended" (19 June 1944).

Air 2/8784 has some addition documentation which bears directly upon the role of William Henry Lunny, the civilian who assisted Eadie. On 22 April 1944,Sgt Eadie himself made the following statement:

I was a wireless operator and air gunner in a Sunderland flying boat which crashed at Trory, Ballinamallard, County Fermanagh, on Sunday, 20th February 1944. When the plane was about to crash it hit some overhead cables and caught fire as it hit the ground. Some members of the crew were thrown clear of the aircraft. I was unconscious for a short period after the crash and when I came round I found Sgt Bodsworth, another member of the crew, lying underneath me. I picked him up and tried to get him out. Just then a civilian named Lunny came along and assisted me to get him out. I jumped out of the plane and discovered that some more members of the crew were inside. Both Lunny and I went into the plane again and found them. The engineer was trying to get out but he was caught by the foot in some wreckage. We pulled him free. He was partly unconscious and was severely injured. We assisted him to the side of the plane and both of us lifted him and another man out. All this time the plane was burning fiercely and ammunition and Verey cartridges were exploding. We both counted the crew and found that two were still missing. We made a search for these and went into the plane again. I found one of the men in the bomb room and with the assistance of the Captain, who had been thrown clear at the time of the crash, he was handed out to . This man was unconscious. The remaining man was found lying some distance from the aircraft.

Without the assistance of , I could not have got the injured man out of the plane. He worked very well and displayed great bravery, notwithstanding that the ammunition was exploding all the time and the plane burning. Lunny was the only person of a number who were in the vicinity including Allied troops who made any attempt to give assistance. The others remained as spectators though they were only a short distance away and could have helped had they wished.

The rescued members of the crew, one of whom has since died, would know very little of LunnyĆ¢€™s part in the affair. The only one who might know anything is the engineer and he is not here.

Another statement was made on 20 April 1944 by Mr. Montgomery  of Trory (retired bak official).

On Sunday the 20th February 1944, at about 12.45 p.m. I was in my sitting room when my housekeeper, Mary , ran out of the house shouing that a plane had crashed and was on fire in a field about 150 yards away from my house. I ran as fast as I could but was hindered by having to cross over two fences. I got there in about five minutes, my housekeeper having arrived a few minutes before me. As I was running to the plane across the field I saw two men, a civilian and an Air Force man, lifting men from it. When I arrived I found the civilian to be William Henry  of Trory, Ballinamallard, my neighbour. There were a number of RAF persons who were rescued from the plane lying on the grass away from the burning aircraft.

From the moment I saw it the plane was burning fiercely, the flames reaching to a great height and all the time I heard the noise of ammunition exploding. The plane continued to burn after I arrived and the ammunition was exploding until the arrival of the RAF fire-fighting apparatus, about five minutes or saw after I got to the scene. William Henry  was helping to carry the injured men to the ambulance and had actually carried one who was very seriously injured and who, I believe, has since died, into his own house. I gave assistance to the men who were injured until the arrival of the Doctor and others. The scene as I saw it when approaching the plane was that William Henry and the Air Force man seemed to be in the centre of the plane and the middle of the fire. Lunny was actually standing on the side of the plane and jumping down with an Air Force man, then up again and grabbing another and down again. He did this at least three times.

William Henry , a farmer, was awarded the British Empire  as per  Gazette Supplement dated 15 August 1944 (citation published).


 
Special thanks to:
 
 James Stewart     N.Ireland 
Joe O'Loughlin     N.Ireland
    Breege Mc Cusker  N.Ireland 
John Newall         Canada
                               Richard Lebek  Canada ( crew member U-672)
Norman Lebek   Canada
 Roland Berr      Germany
                                Harry Lorkin   U.K. (RAF 226 Squadron)          
     John Rogers          UK            
                                    N.Jack Logan       Canada   (RCAF 422 Squadron)
              Les and Maureen Ingram  Scotland
   Bill Barber            Canada    
  Robert Walsh        N.Ireland  
                         Capt. Jerry Mason USN (ret.)  Canada         
             Blake Wimperis      Canada              
                                   Robert Quirk     Canada                                          
                                    Norm Muffitt          Canada                                      
                         Lt/Col S. Beaton     Canada  (Camp Borden)
       Stephanie Pinder     USA            
    Alec (Johnny) Johnston    N.Z.
                 Stephen Kerr           N.Ireland             
                                   Reg Firby               Canada (RCAF 423 Squadron)
         Maurice Duffill         Australia     
                   John Hartshorn              UK                     
                                  Don Macfie      Canada ( RCAF 422/423 Squadron)
                               Frank Cauley   Canada  ( RCAF 422 Squadron)
                                Harold O'Brien  Canada  ( RCAF 423 Squadron)
                                   James Newall          UK        ( RAF 423 Squadron)
      Ian Meadows                    UK
                     Bill Baker                 Canada               
John Taylor      Canada
            Gordon Burke              Canada
          Carol Whittle                    U.K.

Last Update on Dec 07 , 2010